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Upcoming PCPG events

    • November 16, 2021
    • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • Webinar
    • 145
    Register

    Geology and Geomorphology of the Youghiogheny River and Laurel Highlands

    Presenter

    Frank J. Pazzaglia, PhD

    Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Lehigh University

    Please read:  After registering on our site you'll receive a PCPG confirmation email indicating Action Required in the subject line. Your registration is not complete until you click through the unique link in that email directing you to the GoToWebinar web site, enter your name, email address, consent to terms and conditions, and click the Register button.  Check your spam filter if you do not see the PCPG 'Action Required' email within 60 seconds of registering, here.

    PCPG will circulate a PDH certificate documenting registrant’s participation time, not to exceed 60 minutes, within 72 hours of the conclusion of the webinar.

    Level: Intermediate

    Who should attend:  Anyone interested in geomorphology, Quaternary geology, landscape evolution, and tectonics in PA.

    Webinar Overview:  New surficial mapping and dating of alluvial deposits along the Youghiogheny River in southwestern Pennsylvania has generated a new terrace stratigraphic model linking well-known deposits of the Carmichaels Formation with terraces further upstream through Ohiopyle State Park. Flights of four to six terraces are found in three distinct zones with gradients that are subparallel to the channel, including a steep convex reach of the river. Numeric ages obtained from 25 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) samples and one optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) sample constrains the timing of terrace genesis on the Youghiogheny River, over the past 1.2 Ma, with terrace deposition coinciding with glacial climates. TCN burial and isochron ages of ~610 ka and ~300-350 ka are used to construct long-term incision rates ranging from ~20 m/Myrs upstream of Ohiopyle where the channel gradient and subparallel terrace profiles are gentle to ~50 m/Myrs downstream of Ohiopyle where the river profile is steeper in a broad convex knickzone.  There were at least two base level falls totaling ~81 m conflated in the knickzone between Ohiopyle and Connellsville, the top of which includes Ohiopyle Falls and is retreating at a rate of ~1 cm/yr.  Of the total base level fall, ~45 m is likely attributed to the draining of Glacial Lake Monongahela and formation of the Ohio River now dated at ~1.8 Ma by TCN burial ages on type-Carmichaels lacustrine facies exposed along the river in the Pittsburgh low plateau. The other ~36 m is attributed to non-uniform uplift of the Laurel Highlands, with a hinge more or less at Connellsville, which may be ongoing.

    About our Presenter Frank Pazzaglia is a geologist and geomorphologist who studies active tectonics, using rivers and dated geomorphic markers as observables to measure and model river incision into uplifting landscapes.  He earned his PhD at Penn State in 1993, completed a post-doc at Yale, was Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico before moving to Lehigh in 1999 as an Associate and now Full Professor. The webinar is a follow up to work completed by Frank and his students at Lehigh over the past 5 years, in collaboration with the PA Geological Survey, and the recent focus of the 2021 Field Conference of PA Geologists.

    • December 07, 2021
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Webinar
    • 162
    Register

    Using Petrologic, Geochemical, and Structural Analyses to Unravel the History of the Ultramafics of Southeastern Pennsylvania

    Presenter

    Ryan Kerrigan, Ph.D., P.G.

    Associate Professor of Geology

    Department Chair - Energy & Earth Resources

    University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown


    Please read:  After registering on our site you'll receive a PCPG confirmation email indicating Action Required in the subject line. Your registration is not complete until you click through the unique link in that email directing you to the GoToWebinar web site, enter your name, email address, consent to terms and conditions, and click the Register button.  Check your spam filter if you do not see the PCPG 'Action Required' email within 60 seconds of registering, here.

    PCPG will circulate a PDH certificate documenting registrant’s participation time, not to exceed 60 minutes, within 72 hours of the conclusion of the webinar.

    Level: Intermediate to Advanced

    Who should attend: People interested in igneous & metamorphic petrology, geochemistry, structural geology, tectonics, and Appalachian geology.

    Webinar Overview:  An examination of ultramafic bodies in southeastern Pennsylvania using field mapping, petrography, and geochemistry has revealed four distinct styles of alteration. The ultramafic bodies are lenticular in shape ranging from 6 km to 0.5 km along their long axis. The bodies are generally adjacent to major shear zones in the region and are considered to have been emplaced during the Taconic Orogeny (470 Ma). Trace elements indicate that the ultramafic protoliths are likely related to the collided island arc rather than ophiolitic or mantle upwelling settings.

    Four styles of alteration can be identified: complete serpentinization, blackwall alteration (i.e., a nominally anhydrous cores surrounded by “onion-skin” alteration zones of increasing hydration), sheared blackwall alteration, and siliceous alteration. The westernmost bodies trending west-southwest are encompassed in the Grenvillian (1.0 Ga) mafic Baltimore Gneiss and exhibit complete serpentinization. The serpentine is mainly mesh texture lizardite with relict olivines indicating an olivine-rich protolith. However, the close association with the mafic Baltimore Gneiss may indicate Si-poor fluids reducing the possibility of the anthophyllite-talc alteration seen in the blackwall altered bodies. The remaining three alteration styles are found on the eastern side of the Piedmont within the Taconic (470 Ma) Wissahickon schist trending south-southwest. Two sets of parallel trending bodies closest to northern Philadelphia and adjacent to the Rosemont Shear Zone exhibit blackwall alteration. Counterintuitively, the set closest the Rosemont Shear Zone show little shear deformation and retain their “onion-skin” alteration zones typically with cores of orthopyroxenite. The set slightly further (~1 km) from the Rosemont Shear Zone show significant shear deformation (strain shadows, unit duplication, etc.). The two largest ultramafic bodies show a mix of blackwall alteration, serpentinization, and siliceous alteration. Siliceous alteration is most significant in close proximity with intruding granitic intrusions. The Philadelphia-area ultramafic bodies may represent a dismembered layered mafic complex below an island arc with the olivine-rich stratigraphic bottom to the west and the upper orthopyroxenites to the east. 

    About our Presenter:   Dr. Ryan Kerrigan graduated from Bridgewater State University with a B.S. in Geology and B.A. in Chemistry before attending the University of Minnesota for his M.S. in mineralogy/petrology. Dr. Kerrigan moved to the University of Maryland to complete his Ph.D. in experimental petrology. After his Ph.D., Dr. Kerrigan spent four years in the private sector completing environmental site assessments and remediation projects where he earned his Professional Geologist’s license. In the Fall of 2014 Dr. Kerrigan joined the faculty at University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown and is now an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Energy and Earth Resources.  Dr. Kerrigan’s current research interests include: hydrothermal alteration of ultramafic/mafic rocks, the petrogenesis of granitic and pegmatitic bodies, provenance of orogenic emplacement formations, geology of the central Appalachian Piedmont, and pedagogy in the geological sciences.

    • March 29, 2022
    • 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Chester County Public Safety Training Campus, 137 Modena Rd., Coatesville, PA
    • 22
    Register

    Hydrostructural Methods in Bedrock Aquifer Characterization and Remedial Decision Making

    Instructor

    Thomas D. Gillespie P.G., Sr. Professional Geologist
    Gilmore & Associates, Inc.


    Agenda and Instructor Bio

    Read what others have said about this seminar.

    Chester County Public Safety Training Campus

    137 Modena Rd.

    Coatesville, PA


    Facility Directions

    PCPG seminars quickly sell out. To confirm your seat, use our secure web enrollment and a credit card.

    8:00:  Registration Opens
    8:30 - 4:30:  Seminar, with morning refreshments and lunch provided.

    Level:  Advanced

    As in all groundwater systems, gravity-driven flow through bedrock formations occurs within a single integrated hydrologic potential field in which every particle of groundwater residing in connected pore spaces below the phreatic surface is affected by, and contributes to, the overall field potential. Flow in most bedrock aquifers occurs through a three-dimensional network of saturated, hydraulically connected planar discontinuities which typically occur in multiple, pervasive, non-randomly oriented sets, each set being possessed of a unique, statistically averaged, orientation. Therefore, bedrock formations generally contain discontinuities at several predominant strike directions, typically none of which are parallel to the groundwater flow vector. Consequently, groundwater flow along a field hydraulic gradient is sub-parallel to the strikes of all planes, providing for three-dimensional flow as dictated by the flow field.

    Combining a refresher on the concepts and methods of structural geology with quantitative analysis of gravity-driven groundwater flow within and between discrete, connected, planar flow pathways, this full day, hands-on course provides the tools of both visualization and quantification of flow in three-dimensional space. Including a complete review of the methods of planar structural analysis, the course explores: the control of geologic structure on groundwater flow within individual fractures; anisotropic responses to aquifer testing and a comparison to field anisotropy; structurally-controlled deflection of tracers and/or contaminant plumes; the effects of the scale of observation on aquifer heterogeneity and anisotropy; migration of separate phase liquids and gases; the hydrologic effects of fault systems; groundwater flow within structural domains of differing, yet overlapping, scales of observation.   

    • April 19, 2022
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • 3240 Schoolhouse Road, Middletown, PA

    Save the date!

    Registration Opens November 15

    Essentials of Borehole Geophysics

    Scott Wendling, P.G., Vice President

    ARM Geophysics

    Overview

    • Introduction and Overview of Well Logging & Imaging
    • Reading Logs
    • Logging Methods & Tool Responses
    • Applications of Well Logging and Imaging
    • Geologic Interpretation of Well Logs
    • Field Demonstration
    • September 30, 2023
    • See order form
    Register
    To order a replacement certificate for a previously attended PCPG event, please complete the order form and remit payment.

    Replacement will occur only if attendee initialed the sign-in/sign-out sheet.

    During busy periods, certificate replacement may take 7-10 days.

    Questions? Contact Rose Jeffries by phoning (717) 730-9745.





 

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